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Movement Challenge Exercise How-To’s

You’ll find instructions on how to do each exercise and guidelines on how to make them easier or more difficult depending on your preferences.

You can jump straight to any exercise by clicking on their link:


Bear Crawls:

The bear crawl is a great full-body exercise that can be used as a warm-up, for cardiovascular health and endurance, or to improve core function and stability.

How to do bear crawls
Image source: Coach Magazine

If you need a bit of guidance on the bear crawl:

  • Get down on to all fours with your hands underneath your shoulders and your knees underneath your hips.
  • Lift your knees off the ground while keeping a flat and neutral back.
  • Your chin should be slightly tucked in and head in a straight, neutral position (looking downward).
  • Reach forward with one arm while stepping forward with the opposite leg.
  • Then repeat with the other arm and leg, alternating in a controlled crawling motion.
  • 1 rep = 1 arm and leg (e.g. left arm and right leg, then 2nd rep would be right arm and left leg).
  • If you are struggling to visualise these instructions here is a video on how to do the bear crawl.

If you want to make the bear crawl easier:

  • Slow down. Sometimes coordination can be a problem, especially if you are new to this exercise. Slow down and practice doing one movement at a time: Left hand plus right foot, and then right hand plus left foot. If you really need help with coordination, lift your left hand plus right foot into the air and pause there for a second or two before moving them forward and down, and then do the same with your right hand plus left foot.

If you want to make the bear crawl harder:

  • Go faster. Turn this into a more metabolically challenging exercise by increasing your speed (as long as you can maintain good coordination and form).
  • Add in reverse bear crawls. Alternate between crawling forward and crawling backwards in reverse.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Bird Dogs:

The Bird Dog is one of the Dr. McGill “Big Three” for core and lower-back strength. It’s an excellent exercise for preventing and rehabilitating back pain by creating stiffness that enhances stability in a spine-sparing way.

Image source: Squat University

If you need a bit of guidance on the Bird Dog:

  • Begin in the all-fours position with your knees about hip-width apart and your hands straight out under your shoulders.
  • You may find it helpful to position your hands a bit wider than shoulder-width apart for more stability.
  • Brace your core and keep your spine in a straight neutral position throughout the exercise.
  • Kick one of your legs straight backwards while simultaneously punching the opposite side arm forwards.
  • The heel of your extended leg and the fist of your extended arm should both be pushed out as far as possible.
  • Aim for reaching behind and in front of you rather than trying to raise your leg and arm upwards.
  • Don’t let your back round or hips tilt. Keep a straight back and neutral spine.
  • Hold this position for 3-5 seconds before returning to the starting position in all-fours and repeat with the opposite arm and leg (or you can repeat several times on one side before switching to the other).
  • 1 Leg + opposite arm = 1 rep.

If you want to make the Bird Dog easier:

If you want to make the Bird Dog harder:

  • Hold the extended position for 5 or even 10 seconds before moving onto the next rep.
  • Try drawing a small square in the air with your outstretched hand or foot (or both at the same time) to further challenge your stability.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Burpees:

Did you know that the burpee was invented by a physiologist in New York City names Royal H. Burpee? He invented it as a simple way to assess the fitness of everyday folk (all the fitness tests around that time were strictly focused on athletes and other very fit people). If you happened to be subject to Mr. Burpee’s fitness assessment, he would test your heart rate before doing burpees, and then again afterward, using the measurements in an equation to fairly accurately measure your heart’s ability to pump blood which happens to be a good measure of overall fitness.

Burpee
Image source: Crossfit Catonsville

If you need a bit of guidance on the burpee:

  • Begin in a standing position.
  • Drop down into a squat position and place both hands on the floor in front of you.
  • Jump your feet back so that you are in a straight-arm plank position.
  • Jump your feet forwards back into the squat position.
  • Jump up straight into the air from the squat position.

If you want to make the burpee easier:

  • Use a box. Instead of squatting down and placing your hands on the floor in front of you, rather place them on a low surface such as a box, a sturdy chair or the edge of your bed.
  • Do it slowly. Instead of jumping your feet back and forth you can move one foot at a time.
  • Don’t jump. Instead of jumping straight into the air from the squat position, simply stand up.
  • Women’s Health have a video that demonstrates this easier version.

If you want to make the burpee harder:

  • Add a push-up. Add in a push-up in the bottom position.
  • Jump high. Explode up from your squat as high as you can.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Dips:

How to do dips
Image source: My Beauty Gym

If you need a bit of guidance on the dips:

  • Sit down on the edge of a table bench, chair, or box.
  • Place your hands at your sides on the edge of the surface you are sitting on (with your hands facing forwards and about shoulder-width apart).
  • Push down with your hands, straightening your arms and lifting your body up into the air.
  • Walk your feet forwards until your bum is clear of the surface and your knees are at about a 90-degree angle. This is your starting position.
  • Keeping your arms tucked close to your sides and your elbows pointing backwards, bend your arms and lower yourself towards the ground until your elbows are at about a 90-degree angle.
  • Once you are as low as you can comfortably go, press down with your hands and straighten your elbows, raising yourself back up into the starting position.

If you want to make the dips easier:

  • Decrease range of motion. If you find this exercise too challenging you can decrease the range of motion by only lowering yourself down slightly before pushing back up again.

If you want to make the dips harder:

  • Lower yourself very slowly. Slow down the “eccentric” part of the movement where you are lowering yourself down (2-4 second count).
  • Explode upwards. Speed up the “concentric” part of the movement by pushing yourself up explosively and forcefully, squeezing your triceps at the top of the movement for a second or two.
  • Elevate your feet. You can place your feet on another bench, chair, or box of similar height to the ones your hands are on to shift more weight away from your feet and onto your triceps.
  • Add weight. You can place a weight plate, a stack of books, or anything else heavy-ish on your lap while performing this movement to add more resistance.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Donkey Kicks:

Donkey kicks are a great way to strengthen the glutes while also improving core strength and stability. This is also a very useful exercise for warming up your glutes in preparation for a lower body workout.

Image source: Popsugar

If you need a bit of guidance on the Donkey Kick:

  • Begin in the all-fours position with your knees about hip-width apart and your hands straight out under your shoulders.
  • You may find it helpful to position your hands a bit wider than shoulder-width apart for more stability.
  • Brace your core and keep your spine in a straight neutral position throughout the exercise.
  • Push one foot backwards and upwards, keeping your knee bent.
  • Your knee angle should not change much, instead focus on using your glutes to lift your foot directly toward the ceiling.
  • This is not about how high you can lift your foot, but rather how hard you can squeeze your glutes while keeping a flat back and neutral spine.
  • Return to the starting position and repeat with your other leg.
  • 1 Leg = 1 rep.

If you want to make the Donkey Kick harder:

  • Make the movement as slow and controlled as possible.
  • Keep the rest of your body as tight and stable as possible (it should feel like a bit of an ab exercise after a few reps).
  • Really squeeze your glutes as hard as you can at the top of the movement.

If you want to make the Donkey Kick easier:

  • Reduce the range of motion – don’t worry about pushing your foot back too far or high, just focus on squeezing your glute to lift your leg.
  • If you struggle to be on your knees, stand up and bend forwards to put your hands on a chair or table and then push your leg back as seen in this video.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Glute Bridges:

The glute bridge or hip thrust is the king (or queen) of booty-building exercises!

How to do a glute bridge
Image source: Top.me

If you need a bit of guidance on the glute bridge:

  • Lie with your back flat on the floor.
  • Bend your knees and keep them shoulder width apart, positioning your feet as close to your bum as possible. This is your starting position.
  • Push into the ground with your heels, raising your hips into the air as high as you can.
  • Hold for a second, and then lower yourself back down again into your starting position.

If you want to make the glute bridge easier:

  • Raise your back. Instead of laying on the floor, rest your upper back and shoulders on a low flat object like a bed or a bench (see this photo for an example).

If you want to make the glute bridge harder:

  • Raise your feet. Rest your feet on a low box, bench, or bed.
  • Do one leg at a time. Get into your starting position and then cross a leg, resting your one foot on your lower thigh where your thigh and knee meet and perform the exercise with one leg at a time.
  • Add weight. Hold a dumbbell, barbell, or other convenient weight across your hips while performing the exercise.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


High-Knees:

While often used at a fast-paced high intensity for cardio, high-knees, when done slowly and in a controlled manner, are an excellent core strengthening exercise that also helps to build stability. They’re a great exercise to include as part of any kind of warm-up too.

If you need a bit of guidance:

  • Stand with your feet hip-width apart.
  • Lift your left knee up towards your chest or as high as you comfortably can.
  • Then lower it back down and lift your right knee.
  • Repeat in this alternating manner while keeping your body stable and upright.
  • This is a slow and controlled exercise, you’re not running on the spot.
  • Each knee is 1 rep.

If you want to make it easier:

  • Slow it down and step it out as if marching on the spot.
  • Hold onto a wall or railing for stability.
  • Lift your knees up only as high as you feel comfortable.

If you want to make it harder:

  • Pause at the top. Adding a 2-3 second pause at the top when you’re lifted your knee as high as possible adds greater demands on your core and glutes.
  • Run on the spot. While we encourage you to try the slow and controlled movement first to feel what it’s like, if you’d like to make this exercise harder you can try doing it rapidly as if you’re running on the spot.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Jab-Cross Punches:

The Jab-Cross is a simple boxing sequence that combines the speed of a straight jab punch with the strength of a cross punch. We’ll be forgoing some of the technicalities behind this exercise to make it a bit more suitable for this challenge.

Image source: istockphoto

If you need a bit of guidance on the Jab-Cross:

  • Begin in a boxing stance with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart with your left foot in front (or right, whichever feels most comfortable to you).
  • Bring your fists up near your cheeks to “protect your face”.
  • To do a jab, punch your left hand forward while rotating your palm to face down – almost as if you’re pouring a glass of water with your hand (do this with your right hand if your right foot is forward instead).
  • Snap your hand back to the starting position with your fist in front of your face.
  • Do to a cross, rotate your right hip forward and pivot on your right foot until the heel comes off the ground while punching your right hand forward, again rotating your palm down (do this with your left hip and left hand if your right foot is forward instead).
  • Snap your hand back to the starting position with your fist in front of your face.
  • 1 Jab + Cross punch = 1 rep.

If you want to make the Jab-Cross easier:

  • There’s not much you can do to make this exercise easier other than slowing it down and focusing on the movement.

If you want to make the Jab-Cross harder:

  • Speed it up by adding more power and energy behind your jab cross punches.
  • You can take a quick step forward for each jab cross punch and then stepping backwards before repeating.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Lunges:

For this exercise we will be doing stationary alternating lunges, meaning you will be standing in one spot lunging forwards and then returning to starting position again as opposed to walking lunges where each lunge takes you 1 step forwards.

How to do lunges
Image source: Warrior Women for a Rich Life

If you need a bit of guidance on the lunge:

  • Stand tall and upright with your shoulders back and glutes (bum) tight.
  • Step forwards with your right leg, keeping your body stiff and upright.
  • Lower your body until both knees are bent at about a 90-degree angle.
  • Keep the weight on your heels as you push your feet into the floor and raise yourself back into a standing position.
  • Then alternate the movement by stepping forward with your left leg and repeating.

If you want to make the lunge easier:

  • Try the reverse lunge. Instead of stepping forwards, try stepping backward. This might take more coordination but is generally easier on the legs and back.

If you want to make the lunge harder:

  • Add weight. Make the lunge more challenging by holding a pair of dumbbells or placing a barbell / sandbag across the back of your shoulders.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Mountain Climbers:

Get ready for a great ab workout!

Mountain climber
Image source: New Health Guide

If you need a bit of guidance on the mountain climber:

  • Begin in the push-up / high plank position (see the section on push-ups below). Place your hands firmly on the ground, directly under shoulders. Ground your toes into the floor to stabilize your lower half. Brace your core (tighten your abs as if preparing to take a punch), engage glutes and hamstrings, and flatten your back so your entire body is neutral and straight.
  • Bring one leg up until your knee is as close to your chest as possible.
  • Let your foot briefly touch the ground and then extend your leg back into the starting position.
  • Now do the same with the other leg, alternating back and forth.
  • Each leg is considered 1 rep.

If you want to make the mountain climber easier:

  • Use a box. Instead of starting off in a plank / push-up position on the floor, put your hands on an elevated surface like a box, a chair, or your bed.
  • Do it slowly. Take your time to perform the exercise at the speed you feel most comfortable.

If you want to make the mountain climber harder:

  • Do it faster. Increase how quickly you swap legs.
  • Don’t return to starting position. Instead of putting one leg forwards, pausing, returning to start position, and then repeating with the other leg – put one foot forwards, pause briefly, and then bring your second leg up while lowering your first leg at the same time.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Planks:

Didn’t think you could get away without some good old planking did you?!

Sorry! The plank is a fundamental bodyweight exercise that builds isometric core strength and is great for working your shoulders, arms, and glutes as well.

Make sure you warm up properly before attempting a long or challenging plank. Star jumps, bear crawls, burpees, and other full-body warm-up movements are great choices.

How to plank
Image source: Philadelphia Magazine

If you need a bit of guidance on the plank:

  • Get down into a push-up starting position with your arms extended, forming a straight “plank” between your toes and your arms.
  • Lower yourself down onto your elbows, keeping them about shoulder width apart and positioned directly under your shoulders.
  • Keep your body stabilized and spine in a neutral position by squeezing your glutes (bum), flexing your quads, and bracing your core (abs).
  • Hold this position for as long as necessary / possible without letting your hips sag down or butt rise into the air. Keep breathing deeply and evenly.
  • You can improve your form by gently trying to bring your hips up towards your chest and/or vice versa.

If you want to make the plank easier:

  • Do a straight-arm plank. Instead of lowering yourself onto your elbows, keep your arms straight as if in the top position of a push-up.
  • Lower yourself down onto your knees. This can be applied to either the forearm plank or straight-arm plank by simply resting your knees on the ground instead of staying on your toes.

If you want to make the plank harder:

  • Squeeze hard! Squeeze those glutes, quads, and abs HARD! If doing it properly, you should notice your body beginning to shake slightly.
  • Do one leg at a time. Lift one of your legs up into the air slightly so that it is no longer touching the ground. You may need to re-position your other grounded leg to compensate.
  • Add weight. Get someone to place some weights or books on your upper back.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Push-Ups:

The push-up is a really vital movement in strengthening upper-body muscles such as those in your chest, shoulders, triceps, abdominals and several other smaller supporting muscles. It also plays a key role in developing core strength and for strengthening the bones, ligaments, and insertions of the tendons throughout the upper body.

It’s a truly functional movement that makes real-life activities easier and also improves your efficiency, mobility, and balance when moving around in general.

Push-ups
Image source: Casanova.uy

If you need a bit of guidance on the push-up:

  • Get into a high plank position. Place your hands firmly on the ground, directly under shoulders. Ground your toes into the floor to stabilize your lower half. Brace your core (tighten your abs as if preparing to take a punch), engage glutes and hamstrings, and flatten your back so your entire body is neutral and straight.
  • Lower your body. Begin to lower your body—keeping your back flat and eyes focused about three feet in front of you to keep a neutral neck—until your chest grazes the floor. Don’t let your butt dip or stick out at any point during the move; your body should remain in a straight line from head to toe. Draw shoulder blades back and down, keeping elbows tucked close to your body (don’t “T” your arms).
  • Push back up. Keeping your core engaged, exhale as you push back to the starting position. Pro tip: Imagine you are screwing your hands into the ground as you push back up. That’s one! Repeat for 10 to 20 reps or as many as can be performed with good form.

If you want to make the push-up easier:

  • Off the wall push-ups. This is the easiest push-up variation where you perform a standing push-up against a wall. Simply stand straight up with your arms straight out in front of you, hands touching the wall. Then bend at the elbows as you lean in towards the wall before pushing back up straight again. You can slowly move further and further away from the wall to increase the angle at which you need to lean and make the exercise harder.
  • Off the table push-up. If the wall push-up is too easy, do the same thing except this time you lean against a sturdy table which is much lower and closer to being horizontal than the wall.
  • On your knees push-up. This is performed almost identically to the regular push-up except you will have your knees rested on the ground. It is very important to engage your core and squeeze your buttocks to maintain a straight back.

If you want to make the push-up harder:

  • Bench press. If you have access to a gym with dumbbells and barbells you can do a regular bench press.
  • Single-leg push-up. Raise one leg off the ground while you perform a regular push-up. Alternate which legs are raised every 5-10 reps.
  • Slow negative push-up. Perform a regular push-up but take 3-5 seconds lowering yourself down towards the ground each time before exploding upwards.
  • Decline push-up. Place your feet up on a box, your bed, a chair, a low table, and so on to perform a decline push-up.
  • Clapping push-up. Perform a regular push-up but explode of the ground as fast as possible, doing a quick clap while in the air before landing back on the ground and lowering yourself down again.
  • One-arm push-up. Perform a regular push-up but with 1 arm tucked behind your back. It helps to widen your feet stance quite a bit here and you can also progress towards a one-arm push-up by placing one hand on the ground and one hand on a low box or the bottom step at the bottom of some stairs. Try to keep as much weight off the elevated hand as possible.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Renegade Rows:

Renegade rows are a fantastic core-strengthening exercise that work on anti-rotation stability. They’re typically done with dumbbells as an extremely difficult exercise, but for this challenge, we’ll be doing them with our body weight and possibly even from the knees. So if you do not have dumbbells, as pictured, that is no problem. 

If you need a bit of guidance:

  • Start in the top position of a push-up, with your arms extended straight at shoulder-width apart and your feet nice and wide for stability.
  • With your left hand, push into the ground while a the same time pulling your right hand off the ground. Drive your right elbow back into the air behind you until your right hand is at your waist level.
  • Lower your right hand back down, and then repeat with the other arm.
  • Each arm is 1 rep.

If you want to make it easier:

  • Do it from your knees. Just like doing push-ups from your knees, doing the renegade row from your knees makes it much easier.
  • Move your feet further apart. If you do still want to do this exercise with straight legs, remember that the further apart your feet are the more stability you will have.
  • Move your hands closer together. Only if your shoulders feel comfortable, try moving your hands closer together so that when you remove one hand, your remaining hand is closer to the center of your body.

If you want to make it harder:

  • Move your feet closer together.
  • Move your hands further apart.
  • Add a push-up between each rep.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Side Planks:

The side plank, a less popular but just as beneficial version of the regular plank, is great for building core strength as well as working your shoulders, arms, glutes, and stabilising muscles.

Source: Popsugar

If you need a bit of guidance:

  • Lie on your side with your feet stacked on top of each other and one forearm lined up below your shoulder.
  • Brace your core, squeeze your glutes, and raise your hips until your body is in a straight line from your feet to your head.
  • Maintain this position without letting your hips drop or twist, then lower yourself back down. Split your time or reps up between alternating sides.

If you want to make it easier:

  • Do it from your knees. Just like doing push-ups from your knees or planks from your knees, doing the side plank from your knees makes it much easier. Here’s a video demonstrating it.

If you want to make it harder:

  • Squeeze hard. Squeeze those glutes, quads, and abs HARD!
  • Raise one leg and arm into the air. It should look a bit like this.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Star Jumps:

Star jumps are a fairly common and well-known exercise, but can also be known by other names such as jumping jacks or side-straddle hops.

Star jumps
Image source: Pop Workouts

If you need a bit of guidance on the star jump:

  • Begin in a standing position, with feet together and your hands by your side.
  • Jump gently.
  • While in the air, bring your legs outwards into a shoulder-width or wider position.
  • While in the air, at the same time swing your arms outwards and upwards to over your head.
  • Now reverse this movement but jumping gently and returning your legs and arms to the beginning position.

If you want to make the star jump easier:

  • Slow down. The easiest way to make star jumps easier is to just do them slowly.
  • Step out 1 foot at a time. If you cannot jump, try stepping out one foot at a time as fast as you can while raising your arms.
  • Women’s Health have a video that demonstrates this easier version.

If you want to make the star jump harder:

  • Speed it up. The easiest way to make star jumps harder is to just do them more quickly.
  • Add a wide squat. When you jump your legs out, land in a wide squat position.
  • Add in a narrow squat. When you jump your legs back in again, land in a narrow squat position.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Step Ups:

Step-ups are a great lower body to strengthen your glutes, hamstrings, and quads. Since they’re a single-leg exercise, they’re also great for building stability and coordination.

If you need a bit of guidance:

  • Start with your left foot resting on top of a step or low box / bench / chair.
  • Push through the heel of your left foot and bring your right foot up so that you’re standing solidly on the step with both feet.
  • Step back down with your left foot, followed by your right until both feet are back down on the ground.
  • Now repeat with your right foot leading the way, alternating back and forth.

If you want to make it easier:

  • Lower the step.
  • Hold onto a wall or railing for stability.

If you want to make it harder:

  • Squeeze your glutes. At the top of the step-up, squeeze your glutes to stabilise yourself.
  • Bring your knee up. After you’ve stepped up with your first foot, bring your second foot up and then continue to drive that leg’s knee up as shown in the picture above.
  • Add weight. Hold something heavy in your hands, like dumbbells, water bottles, a heavy bag, etc.
  • Raise the step. The higher step up, the more challenging it will be.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Squats:

The squat is a compound, full-body exercise that is vital in strengthening the muscles of the thighs, hips, buttocks, quadriceps, and hamstrings. It also plays a key role in developing core strength and  for strengthening the bones, ligaments, and insertion of the tendons throughout the lower body.

It’s a truly functional movement that makes real-life activities easier and also improves your efficiency, mobility, and balance when moving around in general.

Squats
Image source: Shutterstock

If you need a bit of guidance on the bodyweight squat:

  • Stand with feet a little wider than shoulder-width apart, hips stacked over knees, and knees over ankles.
  • Roll the shoulders back and down away from the ears. Note: Allowing the back to round (like a turtle’s shell) will cause unnecessary stress on the lower back. It’s important to maintain a neutral spine throughout the movement.
  • Extend arms out straight so they are parallel with the ground, palms facing down (like your hands are on someone’s shoulders at a 7th grade dance). Or, if it’s more comfortable, pull elbows close to the body, palms facing each other and thumbs pointing up.
  • Initiate the movement by inhaling and unlocking the hips, slightly bringing them back. Keep sending hips backward as the knees begin to bend.
  • While the butt starts to stick out, make sure the chest and shoulders stay upright, and the back stays straight. Keep the head facing forward with eyes straight ahead for a neutral spine.
  • The best squats are the deepest ones your mobility allows. Optimal squat depth would be your hips sinking below the knees (again, if you have the flexibility to do so comfortably). Pro tip: Squatting onto a box until the butt gently taps it will be a reminder to squat low.
  • Engage core and, with bodyweight in the heels, explode back up to standing, driving through heels. Imagine the feet are spreading the floor (left foot to the left, right foot to the right) without actually moving the feet.

If you want to make the squat easier:

  • Try doing a box squat where you sit back and down onto your bed or a sturdy chair and then use only your legs to stand back upright again. Try to sit down for as short a time as possible – even better don’t rest your complete body weight on the “box” – rather just sit down until you are touching lightly and then stand back upright again.

If you want to make the squat harder:

  • Goblet squat (hold a dumbbell, kettlebell, or medicine ball) at the center of your chest and squat down.
  • Barbell back squat.

Click here to go back to the exercise index at the top of this page.


Supermans:

The Superman exercise gets it’s name from the fact that you look a little bit like Superman flying through the air.

It’s a fantastic exercise for building strength in your back and core. 

Source: GetHealthyU

If you need a bit of guidance on the Superman exercise:

  • Lie on the floor, face down with your arms stretched out straight overhead.
  • While keeping your arms and legs straight, raise them 10-20 centimetres off the floor.
  • Hold for 2-3 full seconds before lowering your arms and legs back down again.
  • Here is a video of Michelle Trapp demonstrating the exercise as well as some easier variations that we’ll cover below too.

If you want to make the it easier:

  • Do one arm and one leg at a time. Rather than raising both your arms and your legs at the same time, try raising only one arm at a time along with the opposite leg. So raise your left arm and right leg, pause, and lower them back down. Then raise your right arm and left leg, pause, and lower them back down.
  • Raise only your arms. Rather than raising both your arms and your legs, raise only your arms.
  • Raise only your left. Rather than raising both your arms and your legs, raise only your legs.

If you want to make the it harder:

  • Hold for longer.
  • Focus on squeezing your glutes and your back muscles when your arms and legs are in the air.

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Wall Slides:

Wall slides are great for better shoulder mobility, posture, and upper back muscle activation.

If you need a bit of guidance on Wall Slides:

  • Stand with your back against a wall, with your heels, butt, and upper back touching the wall.
  • Walk your feet forwards so that the heels of your feet are about 15cm (half a ruler length) away from the wall.
  • Raise your arms up so that they are at a 90-degree angle and gently press your hands into the wall behind you.
  • Slide your arms up the wall until they’re straight above your head, then bring them back down to the 90-degree position again.
  • Try to keep your arms, butt, and upper back touching the wall the whole time while avoiding arching your lower back.

If you want to make it easier:

  • Move your feet. Bringing your feet further forward away from the wall will make the exercise a bit easier.
  • Move your hands. Allow your hands and arms to slightly drift forward away from the wall if you’re struggling to keep them flat.
  • Sit down on the floor. Use your feet to push your back into the wall and provide more stability.

If you want to make it harder:

  • Move your feet closer to the wall.
  •  Bend your knees. You can turn this into a bit of a squat hold movement by bending your knees and squatting down.

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DISCLAIMER

We have consulted with personal trainers and exercise specialists while picking these exercises to ensure that they are safe and effective. However, the authors and publishers of this work are neither doctors nor personal trainers or exercise specialists themselves.

The information presented here is not intended to replace the advice, diagnosis, or recommendations of professional medical or exercise advice. All content is for general informational purposes only.

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or injuries and have at any stage been advised not to exercise, please consult your physician or a qualified fitness professional prior to starting any exercise programme. Always consult a doctor before embarking on an exercise programme if for any reason at all you suspect that you are not able to take part.